Aggregator

Nicaragua - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to Nicaragua due to limited healthcare availability and arbitrary enforcement of laws. Exercise increased caution in Nicaragua due to crime.

Country Summary: The government of Nicaragua arbitrarily enforces laws for political purposes. Throughout Nicaragua, government officials and law enforcement continue to target those opposed to the rule of President Ortega. The government and its affiliated groups have been reported to:

  • Systematically target opposition figures (regardless of nationality), including former allies, political activists, business representatives, clergy, human rights advocates, and members of the press.
  • Arbitrarily detain pro-democracy advocates.
  • Prevent certain individuals from departing Nicaragua by air or land for political reasons.
  • Arbitrarily seize and/or search private property including personal phones and computers for anti-government content.
  • Arbitrarily detain individuals with unfounded charges of terrorism, money laundering, and organized crime for political motives.

U.S. citizens have reported being subject to this treatment, including harassment and assault by masked individuals.  U.S. citizen residents of Nicaragua also report increased scrutiny of alleged political speech and additional scrutiny by immigration officials. 

Travelers should exercise increased caution and be alert to the risks of crime, including violent crimes such as sexual assault and armed robbery.

Poor infrastructure in parts of the country limits the Embassy’s ability to assist U.S. citizens in emergencies. U.S. government personnel may be subject to restrictions on their movements at any time.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Nicaragua.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Nicaragua has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Nicaragua:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Consider arrangements to depart the country quickly.
  • Ensure your U.S. passport is valid and available for a quick departure from the country, if needed.
  • Avoid demonstrations and restrict unnecessary travel.
  • Do not attempt to drive through crowds, barricades, or roadblocks.
  • Maintain adequate supplies of food, cash, potable water, and fuel in case you need to shelter in place.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Do not display signs of wealth such as expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Nicaragua.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Austria - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions in Austria.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Austria.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Austria has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Austria:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Andorra - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions when traveling to Andorra.

Country Summary: Entry to Andorra can only be done via Spain and France.

Read the country information page for more information on travel to Andorra.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Andorra has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

If you decide to travel to Andorra:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Belgium - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Belgium due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Belgium. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting, music, and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Belgium.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Belgium has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Belgium:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Cayman Islands - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to the Cayman Islands due to COVID-19-related restrictions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Cayman Islands.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Cayman Islands have a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into the Cayman Islands.

If you decide to travel to the Cayman Islands:

 Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Tanzania - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Tanzania due to crime, terrorism, and targeting of LGBTI persons.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania due to the threat of terrorism.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as assault, sexual assault, robberies, mugging, and carjacking, is common.  Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Terrorist groups could attack in Tanzania with little or no warning, targeting embassies, police stations, mosques, and other places frequented by Westerners. Please see the additional information below regarding the increased threat of terrorism in Mtwara Region.

Members of the LGBTI community have been arrested, targeted, harassed, and/or charged with unrelated offenses.  Individuals detained under suspicion of same-sex sexual conduct could be subject to forced anal examinations.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Tanzania.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Tanzania has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Tanzania:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Always carry a copy of your U.S. passport and visa and keep original documents in a secure location.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not leave your food or drink unattended.
  • Stay alert in all locations, especially those frequented by Westerners.
  • Avoid public displays of affection particularly between same-sex couples.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Tanzania.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

There have been reports of violence in Mtwara Region in southern Tanzania. Increased activity by extremists along the southern border has led to attacks against both government and civilian targets.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Haiti - Level 4: Do Not Travel

1 month ago

Do not travel to Haiti due to kidnapping, crime, and civil unrestU.S. citizens should carefully consider the risks of traveling to, and remaining in, Haiti in light of the current security situation and infrastructure challenges.

Country Summary: Kidnapping is widespread and victims regularly include U.S. citizens.   Kidnappers may use sophisticated planning or take advantage of unplanned opportunities, and even convoys have been attacked.  Kidnapping cases often involve ransom negotiations and U.S. citizen victims have been physically harmed during kidnappings. Victim’s families have paid thousands of dollars to rescue their family members.   

Violent crime, such as armed robbery and carjacking, is common.  Travelers are sometimes followed and violently attacked and robbed shortly after leaving the Port-au-Prince international airport. Robbers and carjackers also attack private vehicles stuck in heavy traffic congestion and often target lone drivers, particularly women.  As a result, the U.S. Embassy requires its personnel to use official transportation to and from the airport.

Protests, demonstrations, tire burning, and roadblocks are frequent, unpredictable, and can turn violent.  The U.S. government is extremely limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Haiti – assistance on site is available only from local authorities (Haitian National Police and ambulance services).  Local police generally lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

U.S. government personnel are discouraged from walking in Port-au-Prince and other neighborhoods. Only adult family members over the age of 18 are permitted to accompany U.S. government employees assigned to the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince. U.S. government personnel in Haiti are prohibited from:

  • Visiting establishments after dark without secure, on-site parking;
  • Using any kind of public transportation or taxis;
  • Visiting banks and using ATMs;
  • Driving at night;
  • Traveling anywhere between 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.
  • Visiting certain parts of the city at any time without prior approval and special security measures in place.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Haiti.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Haiti has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Haiti:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds. Do not attempt to drive through roadblocks.
  • Arrange airport transfers and hotels in advance, or have your host meet you upon arrival.
  • Do not provide personal information to unauthorized individuals (i.e. people without official uniforms or credentials) located in the immigration, customs, or other areas inside or near any airports.
  • If you are being followed as you leave the airport, drive to the nearest police station immediately.
  • Travel by vehicle to minimize walking in public.
  • Travel in groups of at least two people.
  • Always keep vehicle doors locked and windows closed when driving.
  • Exercise caution and alertness, especially when driving through markets and other traffic congested areas.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Purchase travel insurance and medical evacuation insurance ahead of time.
  • Review information on Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report on Haiti.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Bosnia and Herzegovina - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Bosnia and Herzegovina due to terrorism and land mines.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Minefields and land mines are present throughout Bosnia and Herzegovina. While suspected hazardous areas are normally clearly marked, several people are killed or injured each year.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Bosnia and Herzegovina has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Remain on hard-surfaced roads and stay out of abandoned buildings due to risks from land mines.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter
  • Review the Country Security Report for Bosnia and Herzegovina.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Somalia - Level 4: Do Not Travel

1 month ago

Do not travel to Somalia due to crimeterrorism, civil unrest, health issues, kidnapping, and piracy.

Country Summary:  Violent crime, such as kidnapping and murder, is common throughout Somalia, including Puntland and the Somaliland region. Illegal roadblocks are widespread. Some schools and other facilities acting as “cultural rehabilitation” centers are operating throughout Somalia with inadequate or nonexistent licensing and oversight. Reports of physical abuse and people being held against their will in these facilities are common.

Terrorists continue to plot kidnappings, bombings, and other attacks in Somalia. They may conduct attacks with little or no warning, targeting airports and seaports, government buildings, hotels, restaurants, shopping areas, and other areas that attract large crowds and are frequented by Westerners, as well as government, military, and Western convoys. Methods of attack can include car bombs, suicide bombers, individual attackers, and mortar fire, among others. While some areas have experienced less severe terrorist activity, such as the Somaliland region, where there have been no major terrorist attacks since 2008, terrorist attacks involving the indiscriminate use of explosive devices and other weapons can take place anywhere in Somalia at any time without warning.

Civil unrest occurs throughout Somalia and can sometimes be violent.

Medical facilities across Somalia have limited capacity and are often nonexistent in rural areas.

Pirates are active in the waters off the Horn of Africa, especially in the international waters near Somalia.

The U.S. government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Somalia due to the lack of permanent consular presence in Somalia, including the Somaliland region.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Somalia, the Federal Aviation Administration has issued a Special Federal Aviation Regulation.  For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Somalia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Somalia has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Somalia:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Review your personal security plan and visit our page on Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Avoid sailing near the coast of Somalia and review the Live Piracy Report published by the International Maritime Bureau.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States.  Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization (if you are traveling on business) or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization (if you are traveling on business), so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas.  This plan should specify whom you would contact first, and how that person should share the information.
  • Identify key sources of possible assistance for you and your family in case of emergency, such as the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate, FBI, the State Department, your employer (if traveling on business), and local friends/family in the high-risk area.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and members of Congress if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones can know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Somalia.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Ecuador - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Ecuador due to crime.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Carchi, Sucumbíos, and the northern part of Esmeraldas provinces, including Esmeraldas city, due to crime.
  • Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue, due to crime.

Country Summary: Crime is a widespread problem in Ecuador. Violent crime, such as murder, assault, express kidnapping, and armed robbery, is common. Transnational criminal organizations and gangs operate in Carchi, Sucumbíos, and the northern part of Esmeraldas provinces, as well as in Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue.

Read the country information page for additional information on traveling to Ecuador.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ecuador has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Ecuador:

Carchi, Sucumbíos, and northern Esmeraldas Provinces – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Transnational crime groups operating in Esmeraldas province have engaged in violent crime and killed local citizens in addition to carrying out bombings targeting Ecuadorian military and law enforcement.

The U.S. government is limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Colombian border area, as U.S. government personnel cannot travel to the provinces of Esmeraldas, Carchi, and Sucumbíos without permission from the Embassy’s security office. However, U.S. government personnel are permitted to travel to the northern bank of the Napo River in Sucumbíos, an area approximately four miles wide, and the portion of Esmeraldas province that is south of Esmeraldas city.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guayaquil, south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Transnational crime groups and local gangs operating in Guayaquil have carried out a series of violent crimes in the region south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue, to include several murders and targeted assassinations, armed robberies, and assaults. The U.S. government is limited in its ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Guayaquil south of Portete de Tarquí Avenue, as U.S. government personnel cannot travel to this area without permission from the Embassy’s security office.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Chile - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Chile due to civil unrest.    

Country Summary: Large-scale demonstrations periodically occur in Santiago and other cities in Chile. Demonstrations can take place with little or no notice, and often result in disruptions to transportation, including service on public buses and the Santiago Metro.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Chile.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Chile has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Chile:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions and obey all curfews.
  • Find a safe location, and shelter in place if in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Monitor local media and local transportations sites (buses, Metro, and airport) for updates and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the U.S. Embassy and Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Chile.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Montserrat - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions in Montserrat.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Montserrat.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Montserrat has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Montserrat:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Canada - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions in Canada.

Read the Country Information page for additional information on travel to Canada.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Canada has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Canada:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Sierra Leone - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Sierra Leone due to crime and civil unrest.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as robbery and assault, occur frequently in Sierra Leone, especially in Freetown.  Local police often lack the resources to deal effectively with serious criminal incidents.

Demonstrations and protests occur in Sierra Leone and on occasion have resulted in violence.

If traveling outside the Freetown peninsula, make all efforts to complete your travel during daylight hours due to increased safety hazards at night.  The U.S. Embassy is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Freetown at night as U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling outside the capital after dark.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Sierra Leone.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Sierra Leone has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Sierra Leone:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Honduras - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to Honduras due to crime.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Gracias a Dios Department due to crime.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as homicide and armed robbery, is common. Violent gang activity, such as extortion, violent street crime, rape, and narcotics and human trafficking, is widespread. Local police and emergency services lack sufficient resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Honduras.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Honduras has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Honduras:

Gracias a Dios Department – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Gracias a Dios is an isolated area with high levels of criminal activity and drug trafficking. Infrastructure is weak, government services are limited, and police and military presence is scarce.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Gracias a Dios as U.S. government employees are restricted from traveling to the area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

French Guiana - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions in French Guiana.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to French Guiana.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined French Guiana has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to French Guiana:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Cuba - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Cuba due to demonstrable and sometimes debilitating injuries to members of our diplomatic community resulting in the drawdown of embassy staff.

Country Summary: Numerous U.S. Embassy Havana employees suffered demonstrable and sometimes debilitating injuries during their service in Havana. Affected individuals have exhibited a range of physical symptoms including ear complaints and hearing loss, dizziness, headaches, fatigue, cognitive issues, visual problems, and difficulty sleeping. We continue to investigate how the health of our diplomats and their family members was severely and permanently damaged.  These symptoms occurred in U.S. diplomatic residences (including a long-term apartment at the Atlantic) and at Hotel Nacional and Hotel Capri in Havana.

The U.S. Embassy in Havana is operating with reduced staffing. Only family members employed by the Embassy may accompany U.S. government employees assigned to Cuba.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Cuba.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Cuba has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Cuba:

 Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Costa Rica - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Costa Rica due to crime.

Country Summary: While petty crime is the predominant threat for tourists in Costa Rica, violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault, occurs in Costa Rica. The Costa Rican government provides additional security resources in areas frequented by tourists.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Costa Rica.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Costa Rica has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Costa Rica:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Democratic Republic of the Congo - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to the Democratic Republic of Congo due to crime and civil unrest.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • North Kivu province due to crime, civil unrest, terrorism, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • Ituri province due to crime, civil unrest, terrorism, armed conflict, and kidnapping.
  • The eastern DRC region and the three Kasai provinces (Kasai, Kasai-Oriental, Kasai-Central) due to crime, civil unrest, armed conflict and kidnapping.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery, armed home invasion, and assault, is common and local police lack resources to respond effectively to serious crime. Assailants may pose as police or security agents.

Demonstrations are common in many cities and some have turned violent. Police have at times responded with heavy-handed tactics that resulted in civilian casualties and arrests.

The U.S. government has extremely limited ability to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens outside of Kinshasa due to poor infrastructure and security conditions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the Democratic Republic of Congo has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the U.S. Embassy's web page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Use caution when walking or driving.
  • Always have a copy of your U.S. passport and DRC visa.  Keep originals in a secure location.  Carry your U.S. passport and DRC visa when crossing provincial borders or flying domestically.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the DRC.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

North Kivu Province – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout North Kivu province. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Terrorist and armed groups operating in North Kivu province have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in North Kivu province as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ituri Province – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout Ituri province. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Terrorist and armed groups operating in Ituri province have attacked military and civilian targets and represent an ongoing threat to humanitarian aid workers and other NGO personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in Ituri province as U.S. government travel to these areas is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Eastern DRC Region and the Three Kasai Provinces – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Violent crime, such as murder, rape, kidnapping, and pillaging, continue throughout South Kivu, Tanganyika, Haut Lomami, Bas-Uele, and Haut-Uele and three Kasai provinces of Kasai Oriental, Kasai Central, and Kasai. Road travelers are frequently targeted for ambush, armed robbery, and kidnapping.

Demonstrations and large gatherings can occur throughout these regions, especially in urban areas, and escalate to violence. Extrajudicial mobs can form rapidly and turn violent, posing a threat to humanitarian aid workers and other personnel operating in the area.

Armed groups, individuals, and military forces routinely clash with each other. Civilians are frequently targeted in attacks.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency consular services to U.S. citizens in eastern DRC and these provinces, as U.S. government travel to these regions is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to the health information.

CuraƧao - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions in Curaçao.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Curaçao.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Curaçao has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Curacao:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.