Aggregator

Venezuela - Level 4: Do Not Travel

2 days 2 hours ago

Do not travel to Venezuela due to crime, civil unrest, poor health infrastructure, kidnapping, and the arrest and detention of U.S. citizens without due process or fair trial guarantees. Exercise increased caution in Venezuela due to terrorism.

Country Summary: On March 11, 2019, the U.S. Department of State announced the withdrawal of diplomatic personnel from U.S. Embassy Caracas. All consular services, routine and emergency, are suspended until further notice. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Venezuela. U.S. citizens in Venezuela who require consular services should try to leave the country as soon and as safely as possible and contact a U.S. embassy or consulate in another country.

Violent crimes, such as homicide, armed robbery, kidnapping, and carjacking, are common. Political rallies and demonstrations occur, often with little notice. Demonstrations typically elicit a strong police and security force response that includes the use of tear gas, pepper spray, and rubber bullets against participants, and occasionally devolve into looting and vandalism. United Nations Human Rights Council Fact-Finding Mission reports from 2020 and 2021 documented human rights abuses attributed to the Maduro regime, including torture, extrajudicial killings, forced disappearances, and detentions without due process and/or fair trial guarantees, or as a pretext for an illegitimate purpose. There are shortages of gasoline, food, electricity, water, medicine, and medical supplies throughout much of Venezuela. The CDC issued a Level 3 “Avoid Nonessential Travel” notice on September 30, 2021, due to inadequate healthcare and the breakdown of the medical infrastructure in Venezuela.

Regime-aligned security forces have detained U.S. citizens for long periods.  The Maduro regime does not notify the U.S. government of the detention of U.S. citizens, and the U.S. government is not granted access to those U.S. citizens.

Colombian terrorist groups, such as the National Liberation Army (ELN), Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia – People’s Army (FARC-EP), and Segunda Marquetalia, operate in Venezuela’s border areas with Colombia, Brazil, and Guyana.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Venezuela, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Notices. This flight prohibition can make emergency medical evacuation flights between the United States and Venezuela difficult or impractical.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Venezuela.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Venezuela has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Venezuela:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Venezuela Affairs Unit’s webpage for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by international visitors.
  • Do not travel between cities after dark.
  • Avoid travel between Simón Bolívar International Airport and Caracas at night.
  • Do not take unregulated taxis from Simón Bolívar International Airport, and avoid ATMs in this area.
  • Avoid demonstrations.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Consider hiring a professional security organization.
  • Establish a “proof of life” protocol with your loved ones, so that if you are taken hostage, your loved ones know specific questions (and answers) to ask the hostage-takers to be sure that you are alive (and to rule out a hoax).
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider.
  • Bring a sufficient supply of over-the-counter and prescription medicines.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Venezuela.
  • Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Be prepared for an indefinite stay, as there are limited international flights into or out of Venezuela, and the Maduro regime has, at times, blocked foreign nationals’ access to departing flights.
  • Be prepared for the high risk of indefinite arbitrary detention on specious charges without consular access.

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review, with the addition of Terrorist risk information.

Saudi Arabia - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

3 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Saudi Arabia due to the threat of missile and drone attacks on civilian facilities.  Exercise increased caution in Saudi Arabia due to terrorism.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to the following locations due to missile and drone attacks and terrorism:

  • Within 50 miles of the Saudi-Yemen border, as well as the cities of Abha, Jizan, Najran, and Khamis Mushayt;
  • Abha airport;
  • Qatif in the Eastern Province and its suburbs, including Awamiyah.

Country Summary: U.S. government personnel must adhere to the above travel restrictions.  As such, the U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these locations.

Missile and drone attacks perpetrated by Iran and Iran-supported militant groups represent a significant threat.  The Islamic Republic of Iran has supplied Yemen-based Houthis and other regional proxy groups with weapons to conduct destructive and sometimes lethal attacks using drones, missiles, and rockets against a variety of Saudi sites, including critical infrastructure, civilian airports, military bases, and energy facilities throughout the country, as well as vessels in Red Sea shipping lanes.  Recent attacks were aimed at targets throughout Saudi Arabia including Riyadh, Jeddah, Dhahran, Jizan, Khamis Mushayt, the civilian airport in Abha, Al Kharj, military installations in the south, as well as oil and gas facilities.

Debris from intercepted drones and missiles represents a significant risk to civilian areas and populations.  Militant groups continue to plan and conduct attacks against locations in Saudi Arabia. U.S. citizens living and working near military bases and critical civilian infrastructure, particularly near the border with Yemen, are at heightened risk of missile, drone, and rocket attacks.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks against Saudi and Western targets throughout Saudi Arabia. Terrorists attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, large gatherings, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.  Terrorists are also known to time attacks around major holidays and/or in response to military operations.  Terrorists have targeted both Saudi and Western government interests, mosques and other religious sites (both Sunni and Shia), and places frequented by U.S. citizens and other Westerners.  ISIS claimed responsibility for a November 2020 IED attack at a cemetery in Jeddah during a ceremony commemorating the end of World War I.  Several Western diplomats were in attendance.  

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Saudi Arabia, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM).  For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Saudi Arabia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Saudi Arabia has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Saudi Arabia:

Yemen Border, Abha airport, and Qatif in the Eastern Province and its suburbs, including Awamiyah – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Militant groups in Yemen have attacked Saudi border towns and other sites in Saudi Arabia with armed drones, missiles, and rockets. Civilians that are near the border with Yemen are especially at risk. Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Saudi Arabia, including in Qatif.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens within 50 miles of the Saudi-Yemen border as U.S. government personnel and their families are restricted from travel to this area.

Visit our website for information on travel to high-risk areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to security information.

FSU College of Education professor selected to participate in Faculty Fellowship Program in Israel

3 days 11 hours ago

Kathleen Clark, professor of mathematics education and director of Florida State University‚Äôs School of Teacher Education, is among 33 faculty members across the U.S. selected to participate in the Faculty Fellowship Program in Israel next month. The trip will take place June 4-17. With major funding from the Jewish National Fund-USA (JNF-USA), the New York-based […]

The post FSU College of Education professor selected to participate in Faculty Fellowship Program in Israel appeared first on Florida State University News.

Kelsey Klopfenstein

COVID-19 Unknown - COVID-19 in French Polynesia

5 days 2 hours ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to French Polynesia. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to French Polynesia.

COVID-19 High - COVID-19 in Taiwan

5 days 2 hours ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Taiwan. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Taiwan.

COVID-19 High - COVID-19 in Lesotho

5 days 2 hours ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Lesotho. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Lesotho.

Slovenia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

5 days 2 hours ago

Exercise normal precautions in Slovenia.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Slovenia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Slovenia has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Slovenia:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Lebanon - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Lebanon due to crime, terrorism, armed conflict, civil unrest, kidnapping and Embassy Beirut’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel to:

  • the border with Syria due to terrorism and armed conflict
  • the border with Israel due to the potential for armed conflict
  • refugee settlements due to the potential for armed clashes

Country Summary: Local security authorities have noted a recent rise in violent crimes, including political violence. Multiple unsolved killings within the past 12 months in Lebanon may have been politically motivated. U.S. citizens living and working anywhere in Lebanon should be aware of the risks of remaining in the country and review their personal security plans.

U.S. citizens who choose to travel to Lebanon should be aware that consular officers from the U.S. Embassy are not always able to travel to assist them. The Department of State considers the threat to U.S. government personnel in Beirut sufficiently serious to require them to live and work under strict security. Movements have been limited further by health and safety precautions related to COVID-19. The internal security policies of the U.S. Embassy may be adjusted at any time and without advance notice.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Lebanon. Terrorists may conduct attacks with little or no warning targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

The Lebanese government cannot guarantee the protection of U.S. citizens against sudden outbreaks of violence. Family, neighborhood, or sectarian disputes can escalate quickly and can lead to gunfire or other violence with no warning. Armed clashes have occurred along the borders, in Beirut, and in refugee settlements. The Lebanese Armed Forces have been brought in to quell the violence in these situations.

There are frequent demonstrations in Lebanon. U.S. citizens should avoid demonstrations and exercise caution if in the vicinity of any large gatherings or protests as some of these have turned violent. Protesters have blocked major roads, including thoroughfares between downtown Beirut and the area where the U.S. Embassy is located, and between Beirut and Rafiq Hariri International Airport.

Kidnapping, whether for ransom, political motives, or family disputes, has occurred in Lebanon. Suspects in kidnappings may have ties to terrorist or criminal organizations.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Lebanon.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Lebanon has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Lebanon: 

Border with Syria – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Starting in August 2014, Lebanon witnessed deadly terror attacks in border towns along Lebanon’s border with Syria, including episodic clashes between the Lebanese Army and Syrian-based violent extremist groups. A 2017 Lebanese Army offensive expelled ISIS militants from territory along Lebanon’s border with Syria. The U.S. Embassy strongly urges U.S. citizens to avoid the Lebanese-Syrian border region. The U.S. Department of State also warns U.S. citizens of the risk of traveling on flights that fly over Syria, which include some flights to and from Beirut.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Border with Israel – Level 4: Do Not Travel

There have been sporadic rocket attacks from southern Lebanon into Israel in connection with the violence between Israel and Hizballah, most recently in September 2019. The U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to avoid this border area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Refugee Settlements – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The U.S. Embassy urges U.S. citizens to avoid travel to refugee settlements, which are prone to outbreaks of violence including shootings and explosions.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

 

 

Mongolia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

5 days 2 hours ago

Exercise normal precautions in Mongolia.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Mongolia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Mongolia has a low level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you travel to Mongolia, you should:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Taiwan - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Taiwan due to COVID-19-related restrictions.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Taiwan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Taiwan has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Taiwan.

 If you decide to travel to Taiwan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information

Jordan - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

5 days 2 hours ago

Exercise increased caution in Jordan due to terrorism. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Within 3.5 km of the Jordanian border with Syria and east of the town of Ruwayshid in the direction of the border with Iraq due to terrorism and armed conflict.
  • Designated Syrian refugee camps in Jordan due to Government of Jordan restrictions on entry into these camps.
  • Zarqa, Rusayfah, and the Baqa’a neighborhood of Ayn Basha due to terrorism and crime.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Ma’an City and as-Salt due to terrorism and crime.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue to plot possible attacks in Jordan. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Jordan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Jordan has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Jordan:

The Border with Syria and Iraq – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Jordan's border with Syria and Iraq given the continued threat of cross-border violence, including the risk of terrorist attacks.

All U.S. government personnel must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions for all official travel within 3.5 km of the Jordan-Syria border, and all travel must occur during day light hours only.  U.S. government personnel must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions for official travel east of the town of Ruwayshid towards the Iraq border, and all travel must occur during daylight hours only.

Personal travel by U.S. government employees to these border areas is not authorized.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Refugee Camps – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Syrian refugee camps in Jordan due to Government of Jordan restrictions on entry into these camps.

All U.S. government personnel on official travel to the four designated Syrian refugee camps listed below (formerly all refugee camps in Jordan) must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions.

  • Azraq Syrian Refugee Camp, Azraq, Zarqa
  • Za’atari Syrian Refugee Camp, Al Zatryah, Mafraq
  • King Abdullah Park Syrian Refugee Camp, Ramtha, Irbid
  • Emirati Jordanian Syrian Refugee Camp (Murijep al Fhoud), Al Jadedah, Zarqa

Personal travel by U.S. government personnel to these refugee camps is not authorized. 

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Zarqa, Rusayfah, and the Baqa’a Neighborhood of Ayn Basha – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Zarqa, Rusayfah and the Baqa’a neighborhood of Ayn Basha due to terrorism and crime.

All U.S. government personnel on official travel to Zarqa, Rusayfah and the Baqa’a neighborhood of Ayn Basha must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions, and all travel must occur during daylight hours only.  U.S. government personnel may transit through these cities on major highways during daylight hours only.

Personal travel by U.S. government personnel to these cities is not authorized.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ma’an and as-Salt – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel to Ma’an and as-Salt due to terrorism and crime.

All U.S. government personnel on official travel to Ma’an and as-Salt must adhere to U.S. Embassy travel restrictions. U.S. government personnel on official travel may transit through these cities on major highways outside of daylight hours.

Personal travel by U.S. government personnel to these cities is permitted during daylight hours only, with the exception of direct transit through these cities, which may also occur during hours of darkness.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Sri Lanka - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Sri Lanka due to fuel and medicine shortages. Exercise increased caution in Sri Lanka due to terrorism. 

Country Summary: Sri Lanka is experiencing shortages of fuel and cooking gas as well as some medicines and essential food items, due to the ongoing economic situation in country. There have recently been protests over the economic situation and queues at gas stations, grocery stores, and some pharmacies. Protests have occurred throughout the country and have mostly been peaceful. In some instances, police have used water cannons and tear gas to disperse protesters. There have also been daily planned power outages across the island, as well as some unplanned power outages, as fuel for backup generators is increasingly scarce. Public transportation in some instances has been limited or curtailed. Travelers should monitor local media for updates on the ongoing situation.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, hospitals, and other public areas.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote areas. 

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Sri Lanka.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Sri Lanka has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to Sri Lanka: 

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.