Aggregator

Vietnam - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

2 months ago

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.                                                                         

Exercise normal precautions in Vietnam.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Vietnam.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Vietnam has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

 If you decide to travel to Vietnam:   

COVID-19 High - COVID-19 in Saint Pierre and Miquelon

2 months ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Saint Pierre and Miquelon. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

COVID-19 High - COVID-19 in Romania

2 months ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Romania. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Romania.

COVID-19 High - COVID-19 in Moldova

2 months ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Moldova. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Moldova.

Romania - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

2 months ago

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Exercise normal precautions in Romania.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Romania. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Romania has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

If you decide to travel to Romania:

Moldova - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

2 months ago

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Reconsider travel to Moldova due toarmed conflict in neighboring Ukraine. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • The Transnistria breakaway region due to the unresolved conflict with the central government.

Country Summary: On February 23, Moldovan authorities declared a State of Emergency for a period of 60 days in light of the regional crisis, which has been extended until June 20.  As a result of the Russian military invasion of Ukraine, there are approximately 90,000 refugees residing in Moldova, but there has been no military spillover from the conflict. Chisinau airport is operating, although there are no flights currently available to Ukraine, Russia, or Belarus.

Read the Moldova country information page for additional information on travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Moldova has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to Moldova:

Transnistria – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to Transnistria due to armed conflict in neighboring Ukraine and the unresolved conflict between this breakaway region and the central government. Several small explosions occurred in the Transnistria region in April and early May, but there were no casualties. Transnistria is a breakaway region that is not under the control of the Moldovan government in Chisinau.  Ukraine has closed its border crossing points into the Transnistrian region. U.S. citizens should depart Transnistria immediately via commercial or private means. Visitors may encounter difficulties at checkpoints along roads leading into and out of Transnistria. Taking photographs of military facilities and security forces is prohibited and may result in trouble with authorities.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens traveling in Transnistria as there are restrictions on U.S. government employees traveling to the area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Indonesia - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

2 months ago

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Exercise increased caution in Indonesia due to terrorism and natural disasters. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Central Sulawesi and Papua due to civil unrest.

Terrorists continue plotting possible attacks in Indonesia. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting police stations, places of worship, hotels, bars, nightclubs, markets/shopping malls, and restaurants.

Natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis or volcano eruptions may result in disruptions to transportation, infrastructure, sanitation, and the availability of health services.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Indonesia.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Indonesia has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

If you decide to travel to Indonesia:

Central Sulawesi and Papua – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

In Central Sulawesi and Papua, violent demonstrations and conflict could result in injury or death to U.S. citizens. Avoid demonstrations and crowds.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Central Sulawesi and Papua as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to those areas.

Mali - Level 4: Do Not Travel

2 months ago

Reissued with updates to U.S. government restrictions on personnel.

Do not travel to Mali due to crime, terrorism, and kidnapping.

On July 29, 2022, the Department ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and family members due to the heightened risk of terrorist attacks in areas frequented by westerners.  The U.S. Embassy continues to have limited ability to provide emergency assistance to U.S. citizens in Mali.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as kidnapping and armed robbery, is common in Mali. Violent crime is a particular concern during local holidays and seasonal events in Bamako, its suburbs, and Mali’s southern regions.  Roadblocks and random police checkpoints are commonplace throughout the country, especially at night.

Terrorist and armed groups continue plotting kidnappings and attacks in Mali.  They may attack with little or no warning, targeting night clubs, hotels, restaurants, places of worship, international diplomatic missions, and other locations frequented by westerners.  Attacks may target Malian government offices, infrastructure, or locations frequented by westerners.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens throughout much  of Mali as U.S. government employee travel outside Bamako is restricted due to security concerns.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Mali, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM).  For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Mali.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Mali has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Mali:

  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify whom you would contact first and how they should share the information.
  • Identify key sources of possible assistance for you and your family in case of emergency, such as the local U.S. embassy or consulate, FBI, the State Department, your employer (if traveling on business), and local friends/family in the high-risk area.
  • Be sure to appoint one family member to serve as the point of contact with hostage-takers, media, U.S. and host country government agencies, and Members of Congress if you are taken hostage or detained.
  • Establish a proof of life protocol with your loved ones so that, if you are taken hostage, your loved ones will know specific questions and answers to ask the hostage-takers to be sure you are alive and to rule out a hoax.
  • Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Guard your passport and wallet when in crowded outdoor areas and open-air markets.
  • Be vigilant for pickpockets, especially at night.
  • Use all available safety measures in your home or hotel, including locking doors and windows at all times, and setting the alarm.
  • If asked to stop by police, stop only in well-lit areas or places where several officers are posted.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups.
  • Leave your expensive/sentimental belongings behind.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Mali.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 

Mozambique - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

2 months ago

Reissued with updates to information about Cabo Delgado Province and removal of concerns for Sofala and Manica provinces, areas between Chibabava and Gorongosa, and areas between Chimoio and Tica.

  Exercise increased caution in Mozambique due to crime, terrorism, and health issues. Some areas have greater risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.  

Do Not Travel To:  

  • Certain districts in Cabo Delgado Province due to terrorism.  

 Reconsider Travel To:  

  • Pemba, the provincial capital of Cabo Delgado, due to threat of terrorism.  

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as mugging, is common.  

Terrorist groups in northern Mozambique continue to be active.  Public areas may be attacked with little or no warning.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Mozambique has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

Mozambique’s health infrastructure is limited: there are only three doctors per 100,000 people, frontline health providers are often poorly trained, and medicine shortages are common.  More than 1.2 million people in Mozambique have HIV/AIDS, representing a sizable population with compromised immune systems.  In the event of a public health emergency, access to an ICU and ventilator support is highly unlikely.  

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Mozambique.

If you decide to travel to Mozambique:  

  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.  
  • Have travel documents up to date and easily accessible.   
  • Keep a low profile.   
  • Be aware of your surroundings.   
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.   
  • Consider hiring a professional security organization if traveling to the affected areas of Cabo Delgado.
  • Be aware of increased government security checkpoints in Cabo Delgado Province.   
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.   
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.   
  • Review the Country Security Report for Mozambique.   
  • Have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.  
  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.   
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.  

Certain Districts in Cabo Delgado Province – Level 4:  Do Not Travel  

Terrorists continue to conduct and plot attacks on government forces, villages, and key supply routes in the districts of Ancuabe, Chuire, Ibo, Macomia, Meluco, Metuge, Mocimboa da Praia, Mueda, Muidumbe, Nangade, Palma, and Quissanga in the northern province of Cabo Delgado.  

Pemba, Capital of Cabo Delgado Province – Level 3:  Reconsider Travel  

Terrorist attacks in multiple districts in Cabo Delgado Province present the possibility that the provincial capital of Pemba is vulnerable to attack due to the proximity of violent extremist forces and their increasing sophistication.  

 Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.  

Alert - Yellow Fever in Kenya

2 months 1 week ago
There is a yellow fever outbreak in Kenya. Confirmed cases have been reported in residents of Isiolo and Garissa Counties.

Watch - Marburg in Ghana

2 months 1 week ago
On July 17, 2022, Ghana declared an outbreak of Marburg virus disease. Confirmed cases have been reported in the Ashanti region.

France - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

2 months 1 week ago

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with minor edits.

Exercise increased caution in France due to terrorism and civil unrest.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in France. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Demonstrations in Paris and other major cities throughout France occur regularly. Most demonstrations are peaceful, but some have included violence and property damage, including looting and arson, with reckless disregard for public safety. Police have responded with water cannons, rubber bullets, and tear gas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to France.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined France has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

If you decide to travel to France:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
  • Be aware of your surroundings. Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities including movement restrictions related to any ongoing police action.
  • Find a safe location, and be prepared to shelter in place if in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for France.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Burma (Myanmar) - Level 4: Do Not Travel

2 months 1 week ago

Last Update: Reissued after periodic review with updates to information on civil unrest, armed conflict, land mines and unexploded ordnance, and health resources.

Do not travel to Burma due to civil unrest and armed conflict.  Reconsider travel to Burma due to COVID-19-related restrictions and limited and/or inadequate healthcare resources.  Exercise increased caution due to wrongful detentions and areas with land mines and unexploded ordnance.

COUNTRY SUMMARY: The Burmese military detained and deposed elected government officials in the February 2021 coup d'état.  Protests and demonstrations against military rule occur.  The military often responds to these protests by arbitrarily arresting individuals and with the indiscriminate use of deadly force against protesters and bystanders.

The Department has determined that at least one U.S. national is wrongfully detained by the Burmese military regime.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services in Burma as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of Rangoon.  Minor dependents cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Burma.

Civil unrest and armed conflict occur throughout BurmaThe level of civil unrest and armed conflict varies significantly between and within states and regions and may change at any time.

Civil unrest and armed violence due to fighting between the Burmese military and various ethnic groups and militia occur in parts of Chin, Kachin, Kayin, Rakhine, Shan state, Sagaing, and Magway.

In Northern Shan state and parts of Chin, Kachin, and Rakhine states there are land mines and unexploded ordnance; their locations are often not marked or identifiable, and foreign travelers have been injured in the past.

The military regime arbitrarily enforces local laws, including carrying out random and wrongful detentions without due process.  U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Burma may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime.  U.S. citizens may be subject to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.  Local law enforcement officials may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for speaking out or protesting against the military regime, including on their personal social media accounts, and for sending private electronic messages critical of the military regime.

Burma has limited and/or inadequate healthcare resources due to critical staffing shortages in the public sector health workforce.  Importation of medical supplies, including medicine, into Burma is not consistent and medical prescriptions and over-the-counter medicine may not be available.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Burma has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Burma.

If you decide to travel to Burma:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Burma.
  • Do not touch unknown metal objects and avoid traveling off well-used roads, tracks, and paths due to risk of unexploded ordnance.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country.
  • Review local laws and conditions before traveling.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Find a suggested list of such documents here.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization.
  • Erase any sensitive photos, comments, or other materials that could be considered controversial or provocative by local groups from your social media pages, cameras, laptops, and other electronic devices prior to travel.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ethiopia - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

2 months 1 week ago

Last Update: Reissued with updates to “Do Not Travel” areas

Reconsider travel to Ethiopia due to armed conflict, civil unrest, communications disruptions, crime, and the potential for terrorism and kidnapping in border areas.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Tigray Region and border with Eritrea due to armed conflict, civil unrest, and crime.
  • Amhara Region due to armed conflict and civil unrest.
  • Afar Region due to armed conflict and civil unrest.
  • Border area with Somalia due to potential for terrorism, kidnapping, and landmines.
  • Border areas with Sudan, and South Sudan due to crime, kidnapping, civil unrest, and ongoing clashes between various armed groups.
  • Border areas with Kenya due to potential for terrorism and ethnically motivated violence.
  • The Wollega Zones of the Oromia Region due to violence and civil unrest.

The situation in Addis Ababa is stable. However, there is armed conflict and civil unrest in other areas of Ethiopia, and the security situation may deteriorate without warning. The U.S. Embassy is unlikely to be able to assist with departure from the country if the security situation deteriorates. Due to armed conflict and civil unrest throughout parts of Ethiopia, travel by U.S. government personnel is routinely assessed for additional restrictions. Please see information on What the Department of State Can and Can't Do in a Crisis.

U.S. officials have very limited consular access to U.S. citizens detained by Ethiopian authorities. The government of Ethiopia has previously restricted or shut down internet, cellular data, and phone services before, during, and after civil unrest. Telecommunication, electricity, and other public services remain largely unavailable in the Tigray region as well as other areas affected by conflict. These restrictions impede the U.S. Embassy’s ability to communicate with and provide consular services to U.S. citizens in Ethiopia.

The U.S. Embassy has limited ability to provide services to U.S. citizens outside of Addis Ababa. Please contact the Embassy’s American Citizen Services Unit at AddisACS@state.gov for further information.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Ethiopia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ethiopia has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Ethiopia:

Tigray Region and Border with Eritrea – Do Not Travel

Due to armed conflict, the Tigray Region and the border with Eritrea are currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts. Due to the current situation in Tigray, the border roads with Eritrea are closed. Conditions at the border may change with no warning.

Amhara Region – Do Not Travel 

Due to armed conflict, the Amhara Region is currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Afar Region – Do Not Travel

Due to armed conflict, the Afar Region is currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Border Area with Somalia – Do Not Travel

Terrorists maintain a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting a risk of cross-border attacks and kidnappings. Landmines are present in this region. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas with Somalia, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Border Areas with Sudan and South Sudan – Do Not Travel

Crime, kidnapping, the potential for ethnically motivated violence, and ongoing clashes between various armed groups exist near the Ethiopian borders with Sudan and South Sudan. This includes but is not limited to the Nuer Zone and the Jore Woreda of the Agnuak Zone in the Gambella region, and the Pawe, Guba, Dangur, Dibati, and Bulen Woredas, and the Metekel Zone in the Benishangul Gumuz region. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas of Sudan and South Sudan, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Border Areas with Kenya – Do Not Travel

Terrorists, particularly Al-Shabaab, maintain a presence in this area, and ethnically motivated violence has been reported. This includes but is not limited to the Konso Zone and surrounding areas. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas with Kenya, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Oromia Region – Specific Zones – Do Not Travel

The following towns and areas in Oromia due to ethnically motivated violence: Horro-Guduru Wollega, East Wollega, West Wollega, Kelem Wollega, Nekemte, Ambo, Fiche, Chiro, Negele, and Wenchi Crater Lake. 

Visit our website for advice if you decide to Travel to High-Risk Areas.

COVID-19 Unknown - COVID-19 in Dominica

2 months 1 week ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Dominica. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Dominica.

COVID-19 Unknown - COVID-19 in Ethiopia

2 months 1 week ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Ethiopia. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Ethiopia.