Aggregator

Hong Kong - Level 4: Do Not Travel

3 weeks 5 days ago

Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws and COVID-19-related restrictions. Do not travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), Jilin province, and Shanghai municipality due to COVID-19-related restrictions, including the risk of parents and children being separated. Reconsider travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong SAR due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

On April 11, 2022, the Department ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and all family members from the Consulate General Shanghai consular district due to a surge in COVID-19 cases and the impact of restrictions related to the PRC’s response.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the PRC has a low level of COVID-19 and a high level of COVID-19 for Hong Kong. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

The zero-tolerance approach to COVID-19 by the PRC and Hong Kong governments severely impacts travel and access to public services. All travelers should prepare to quarantine at a government-designated location for a minimum of 14 days upon arrival. While in quarantine, health authorities will test travelers as often as daily for COVID-19 and will not permit travelers to leave their rooms. Travelers who test positive during this quarantine time will be transferred to a government-designated medical or quarantine facility. Standards of care, accommodations, testing, and treatments may differ considerably from standards in the United States. Even after completing quarantine on-arrival, travelers to the PRC and Hong Kong may face additional quarantines and mandatory testing as well as movement and access restrictions, including access to medical services and public transportation. In some cases, children in Hong Kong and the PRC who test positive have been separated from their parents and kept in isolation until they meet local hospital discharge requirements.

Travelers within the PRC and Hong Kong may be subject to mandatory testing. In areas with confirmed COVID-19 cases, restrictions may include being confined to home or moved to a government- designated quarantine facility or hospital. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in the PRC, or the Consulate General Hong Kong's COVID-19 page for information on the COVID-19 situation in Hong Kong as testing and travel requirements frequently change.

Country Summary: The PRC government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including carrying out arbitrary and wrongful detentions and using exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries without due process of law. The PRC government uses arbitrary detention and exit bans to:

  • compel individuals to participate in PRC government investigations,
  • pressure family members to return to the PRC from abroad,
  • influence PRC authorities to resolve civil disputes in favor of PRC citizens, and
  • gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments.

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of an exit ban when they attempt to depart the PRC, and there is no reliable mechanism or legal process to find out how long the ban might continue or to contest it in a court of law.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.

Foreigners in the PRC, including but not limited to businesspeople, former foreign government personnel, and journalists from Western countries have been arbitrarily interrogated and detained by PRC officials for alleged violations of PRC national security laws. The PRC has also threatened, interrogated, detained, and expelled U.S. citizens living and working in the PRC.

Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC government.

The PRC government does not recognize dual nationality. U.S.-PRC citizens and U.S. citizens of Chinese heritage may be subject to additional scrutiny and harassment, and the PRC government may prevent the U.S. Embassy from providing consular services.

XINJIANG UYGHUR AUTONOMOUS REGION and TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice.

HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

Since the imposition of the National Security Law on June 30, 2020, the PRC unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power in the Hong Kong SAR. The PRC has demonstrated an intention to use this authority to target a broad range of activities it defines as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign entities. The National Security Law also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, which could subject U.S. citizens who have been publicly critical of the PRC to a heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution. PRC security forces, including the new Office for Safeguarding National Security, now operate in the Hong Kong SAR and are not subject to oversight by the Hong Kong judiciary.

Demonstrations: Participating in demonstrations or any other activities that authorities interpret as constituting an act of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion with a foreign country could result in criminal charges. On June 30, 2020, as part of its color-coded system of warning flags, the Hong Kong police unveiled a new purple flag, which warns protesters that shouting slogans or carrying banners with an intent prohibited by the law could now bring criminal charges. U.S. citizens are strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations.

Propaganda: A PRC propaganda campaign has falsely accused individuals, including U.S. citizens, of fomenting unrest in the Hong Kong SAR. In some cases, the campaign has published their personal information, resulting in threats of violence on social media.

Read the country information page for the PRC and the country information page for the Hong Kong SAR for additional information on travel.

If you decide to travel to the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, read the Embassy COVID-19 page for the PRC and the Consulate General COVID-19 page for the Hong Kong SAR for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, monitor local media, local transportations sites and apps like MTR Mobile or CitybusNWFB, and the Hong Kong International Airport website for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Avoid taking photographs of protesters or police without permission.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, review your Hong Kong flight status with your airline or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Enter the PRC on your U.S. passport with a valid PRC visa and keep it with you.
  • If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or the nearest consulate immediately.
  • If you plan to enter North Korea, read the North Korea Travel Advisory. Travelers should note that U.S. passports are not valid for travel to, in, or through North Korea, unless they are specially validated by the Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. Follow the U.S. Embassy on Twitter, WeChat, and Weibo. Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the PRC and the Hong Kong SAR.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

China - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

3 weeks 5 days ago

Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws and COVID-19-related restrictions. Do not travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), Jilin province, and Shanghai municipality due to COVID-19-related restrictions, including the risk of parents and children being separated. Reconsider travel to the PRC’s Hong Kong SAR due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws.

On April 11, 2022, the Department ordered the departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and all family members from the Consulate General Shanghai consular district due to a surge in COVID-19 cases and the impact of restrictions related to the PRC’s response.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the PRC has a low level of COVID-19 and a high level of COVID-19 for Hong Kong. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

The zero-tolerance approach to COVID-19 by the PRC and Hong Kong governments severely impacts travel and access to public services. All travelers should prepare to quarantine at a government-designated location for a minimum of 14 days upon arrival. While in quarantine, health authorities will test travelers as often as daily for COVID-19 and will not permit travelers to leave their rooms. Travelers who test positive during this quarantine time will be transferred to a government-designated medical or quarantine facility. Standards of care, accommodations, testing, and treatments may differ considerably from standards in the United States. Even after completing quarantine on-arrival, travelers to the PRC and Hong Kong may face additional quarantines and mandatory testing as well as movement and access restrictions, including access to medical services and public transportation. In some cases, children in Hong Kong and the PRC who test positive have been separated from their parents and kept in isolation until they meet local hospital discharge requirements.

Travelers within the PRC and Hong Kong may be subject to mandatory testing. In areas with confirmed COVID-19 cases, restrictions may include being confined to home or moved to a government- designated quarantine facility or hospital. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in the PRC, or the Consulate General Hong Kong's COVID-19 page for information on the COVID-19 situation in Hong Kong as testing and travel requirements frequently change.

Country Summary: The PRC government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including carrying out arbitrary and wrongful detentions and using exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries without due process of law. The PRC government uses arbitrary detention and exit bans to:

  • compel individuals to participate in PRC government investigations,
  • pressure family members to return to the PRC from abroad,
  • influence PRC authorities to resolve civil disputes in favor of PRC citizens, and
  • gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments.

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of an exit ban when they attempt to depart the PRC, and there is no reliable mechanism or legal process to find out how long the ban might continue or to contest it in a court of law.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.

Foreigners in the PRC, including but not limited to businesspeople, former foreign government personnel, and journalists from Western countries have been arbitrarily interrogated and detained by PRC officials for alleged violations of PRC national security laws. The PRC has also threatened, interrogated, detained, and expelled U.S. citizens living and working in the PRC.

Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC government.

The PRC government does not recognize dual nationality. U.S.-PRC citizens and U.S. citizens of Chinese heritage may be subject to additional scrutiny and harassment, and the PRC government may prevent the U.S. Embassy from providing consular services.

XINJIANG UYGHUR AUTONOMOUS REGION and TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice.

HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

Since the imposition of the National Security Law on June 30, 2020, the PRC unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power in the Hong Kong SAR. The PRC has demonstrated an intention to use this authority to target a broad range of activities it defines as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign entities. The National Security Law also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, which could subject U.S. citizens who have been publicly critical of the PRC to a heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution. PRC security forces, including the new Office for Safeguarding National Security, now operate in the Hong Kong SAR and are not subject to oversight by the Hong Kong judiciary.

Demonstrations: Participating in demonstrations or any other activities that authorities interpret as constituting an act of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion with a foreign country could result in criminal charges. On June 30, 2020, as part of its color-coded system of warning flags, the Hong Kong police unveiled a new purple flag, which warns protesters that shouting slogans or carrying banners with an intent prohibited by the law could now bring criminal charges. U.S. citizens are strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations.

Propaganda: A PRC propaganda campaign has falsely accused individuals, including U.S. citizens, of fomenting unrest in the Hong Kong SAR. In some cases, the campaign has published their personal information, resulting in threats of violence on social media.

Read the country information page for the PRC and the country information page for the Hong Kong SAR for additional information on travel.

If you decide to travel to the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, read the Embassy COVID-19 page for the PRC and the Consulate General COVID-19 page for the Hong Kong SAR for country-specific COVID-19 information.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, monitor local media, local transportations sites and apps like MTR Mobile or CitybusNWFB, and the Hong Kong International Airport website for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Avoid taking photographs of protesters or police without permission.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, review your Hong Kong flight status with your airline or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Enter the PRC on your U.S. passport with a valid PRC visa and keep it with you.
  • If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or the nearest consulate immediately.
  • If you plan to enter North Korea, read the North Korea Travel Advisory. Travelers should note that U.S. passports are not valid for travel to, in, or through North Korea, unless they are specially validated by the Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. Follow the U.S. Embassy on Twitter, WeChat, and Weibo. Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the PRC and the Hong Kong SAR.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Saba - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

3 weeks 5 days ago

Saba - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions    

Exercise normal precautions in Saba.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Saba.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Saba has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to Saba:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

COVID-19 High - COVID-19 in Saba

3 weeks 5 days ago
Make sure you are vaccinated and up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines before traveling to Saba. If you are not up to date with COVID-19 vaccines, avoid travel to Saba.

Azerbaijan - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

3 weeks 5 days ago

Reconsider travel to Azerbaijan due to COVID-19-related restrictions and terrorism concerns. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Nagorno-Karabakh region and surrounding territories due to recent hostilities.

Country Summary: Azerbaijan has a longstanding risk presented by terrorist groups, who continue plotting possible attacks in Azerbaijan. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas. 

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Azerbaijan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Azerbaijan has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Azerbaijan.

If you decide to travel to Azerbaijan:

Nagorno-Karabakh – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Casualties continue to occur following intensive fighting in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict that occurred in the fall 2020. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in and around Nagorno-Karabakh as access is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Exercise caution on roads near Azerbaijan’s border with Armenia. Be aware that some portions of the road may cross international boundaries without notice. Roads may be controlled by checkpoints or closed to travelers without notice.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

El Salvador - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

3 weeks 5 days ago

Reconsider travel to El Salvador due to crime.

Country Summary:  Violent crime, including armed robbery, homicide and sexual assault are of concern throughout significant portions of the country. Although gang activity varies among departamentos (states) and municipios (municipalities), areas witnessing higher crime rates are often located in close proximity to lower crime areas, or must be crossed in moving between lower risk areas. Local police may lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents, although the concentration of resources in resort areas means these tend to be better policed than urban areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to El Salvador.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined El Salvador has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. 

If you decide to travel to El Salvador:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not walk outside after dark. Do not drive to unfamiliar and/or remote locations after dark.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Engage local guides certified by the national or local tourist authority when hiking in back country areas.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for El Salvador.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Libya - Level 4: Do Not Travel

3 weeks 5 days ago

Do not travel to Libya due to crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

Country Summary: Crime levels in Libya remain high, including the threat of kidnapping for ransom. Westerners and U.S. citizens have been targets of these crimes.

Terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Libya. Violent extremist activity in Libya remains high, and extremist groups have made threats against U.S. government officials and citizens. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, hotels, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and government facilities.

Outbreaks of violence between competing armed groups can occur with little warning and have the potential to impact U.S. citizens. The capital, Tripoli, and other cities, such as Surman, Al-Jufra, Misrata, Ajdabiya, Benghazi, Sabha, and Dernah, have witnessed fighting among armed groups, as well as terrorist attacks. Hotels and airports frequented by Westerners have been the targets of these attacks. Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence.

Militia or armed groups sometimes detain travelers for arbitrary reasons, do not grant detainees access to a lawyer or a legal process, and do not allow detainees to inform others of their status. U.S. citizens should carry proof of citizenship and valid immigration status at all times, but having these documents does not guarantee fair treatment.

Some international and national airports are closed, and flights out of operational airports are sporadic and may be cancelled without warning. The U.S. government is very concerned about the targeting of commercial transportation in Libya and prohibits U.S. commercial aviation operations within Libyan airspace.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency or routine assistance to U.S. citizens in Libya, as the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli suspended its operations in July 2014.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Libya, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Libya.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Libya has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Libya:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.  
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Carry proof of citizenship and valid immigration status at all times.
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.
  • Make contingency plans to leave.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or a power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, and etcetera.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Libya.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Armenia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

3 weeks 5 days ago

Exercise normal precautions in Armenia. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • The Nagorno-Karabakh region and surrounding territories due to recent hostilities.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Armenia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Armenia has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  

If you decide to travel to Armenia:

Nagorno-Karabakh – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Casualties continue to occur following intensive fighting in the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict that occurred in the fall 2020. The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in and around Nagorno-Karabakh as access is restricted.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Exercise caution on roads near Armenia’s border with Azerbaijan. Be aware that some portions of the road may cross international boundaries without notice. Roads may be controlled by checkpoints or closed to travelers without notice.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

United Arab Emirates - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

3 weeks 5 days ago

Reconsider travel to the United Arab Emirates due to the threat of missile or drone attacks.

Country Summary: The possibility of attacks affecting U.S. citizens and interests in the Gulf and Arabian Peninsula remains an ongoing, serious concern.  Rebel groups operating in Yemen have stated an intent to attack neighboring countries, including the UAE, using missiles and drones. Recent missile and drone attacks targeted populated areas and civilian infrastructure.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including the United Arab Emirates, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to the United Arab Emirates.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the United Arab Emirates has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to the United Arab Emirates:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

The Gambia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

3 weeks 5 days ago

Exercise normal precautions in The Gambia. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire travel advisory.

Exercise Increased Caution in:

  • The Gambia’s southern border area adjacent to Senegal’s Casamance region due to the potential presence of landmines.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to The Gambia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined The Gambia has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to The Gambia:

The Gambia’s Southern Border with Senegal – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Some landmines from the Casamance conflict remain in the border region.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Oman - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

3 weeks 5 days ago

Exercise increased caution due to terrorism and armed conflict.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Yemen border area due to terrorism and armed conflict.

Country Summary: Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Oman, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Oman.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Oman has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Oman:

Yemen Border Area

Terrorist attacks and violence continue in Yemen. Crossing the border into Yemen can be dangerous, and U.S. citizens who attempt to cross the Oman-Yemen border, from either Oman or Yemen, may be detained by Omani authorities.

Visit our website for High-Risk Travelers.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

Ethiopia - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

4 weeks 1 day ago

Reconsider travel to Ethiopia due to armed conflict, civil unrest, communications disruptions, crime, and the potential for terrorism and kidnapping in border areas.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Tigray Region and border with Eritrea due to armed conflict, civil unrest, and crime.
  • Amhara Region due to armed conflict and civil unrest.
  • Afar Region due to armed conflict and civil unrest.
  • Border area with Somalia due to potential for terrorism, kidnapping, and landmines.
  • Border areas with Sudan, and South Sudan due to crime, kidnapping, armed conflict, and civil unrest.
  • Border areas with Kenya due to potential for terrorism and ethnic conflict.
  • The Wollega Zones of the Oromo Region due to armed conflict and civil unrest.

The situation in Addis Ababa is stable. However, there is armed conflict and civil unrest in other areas of Ethiopia, and the security situation may deteriorate without warning. The U.S. Embassy is unlikely to be able to assist with departure from the country if the security situation deteriorates. Due to armed conflict and civil unrest throughout parts of Ethiopia, travel by U.S. government personnel is routinely assessed for additional restrictions. Please see information on What the Department of State Can and Can't Do in a Crisis.

U.S. officials have very limited consular access to U.S. citizens detained by Ethiopian authorities. The government of Ethiopia has previously restricted or shut down internet, cellular data, and phone services before, during, and after civil unrest. Telecommunication, electricity, and other public services remain largely unavailable in the Tigray region as well as other conflict areas. These restrictions impede the U.S. Embassy’s ability to communicate with and provide consular services to U.S. citizens in Ethiopia.

The U.S. Embassy has limited ability to provide services to U.S. citizens outside of Addis Ababa. Please contact the Embassy’s American Citizen Services Unit at AddisACS@state.gov for further information.

Read the country information page for additional information about travel to Ethiopia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Ethiopia has a moderate level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Ethiopia:

Tigray Region and Border with Eritrea—Do Not Travel

Due to armed conflict, the Tigray Region and the border with Eritrea are currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts. Due to the current situation in Tigray, the border roads with Eritrea are closed. Conditions at the border may change with no warning.

Amhara Region – Do Not Travel 

Due to armed conflict, the Amhara Region is currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Afar Region – Do Not Travel

Due to armed conflict, the Afar Region is currently off-limits for U.S. government personnel, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity and priority diplomatic engagement efforts.

Border Area with Somalia—Do Not Travel

Terrorists maintain a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting a risk of cross-border attacks and kidnappings. Landmines are present in this region. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas with Somalia, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Border Areas with Sudan and South Sudan—Do Not Travel

Crime, kidnapping, armed conflict, and the potential for ethnic conflict exist near the Ethiopian borders with Sudan and South Sudan. This includes but is not limited to the Nuer Zone and the Jore Woreda of the Agnuak Zone in the in Gambella region, and the Pawe, Guba, Dangur, Dibati, and Bulen Woredas, and the Metekel Zone in the Benishangul Gumuz region. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas of Sudan and South Sudan, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Border Areas with Kenya – Do Not Travel

Terrorists, particularly Al-Shabaab, maintain a presence in this area, and ethnic conflict has been reported. This includes but is not limited to the Konso Zone and surrounding areas. U.S. government personnel are not permitted to travel to the border areas with Kenya, with limited exceptions to support humanitarian capacity efforts.

Oromo Region – Specific Zones – Do Not Travel

The following towns and areas in Oromia due to ethnic violence: Horro-Guduru Wollega, East Wollega, West Wollega, Kelem Wollega, Nekemte, Ambo, Fiche, Chiro, Negele, and Wenchi Crater Lake. 

Visit our website for advice if you decide to Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with update to the travel advisory level for Ethiopia.

Turkmenistan - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to Turkmenistan due to Embassy Ashgabat’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens, and COVID-19-related restrictions.

Country Summary: Currently, international commercial flights are suspended.  Charter flights are infrequent and often operate out of cities that are located hundreds of miles from Ashgabat.

Please read the country information page for additional information on travel to Turkmenistan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Turkmenistan has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel. Commercial transportation to and from Turkmenistan is not available or only sporadically available. It may be difficult to enter and leave Turkmenistan and travelers should expect delays entering Turkmenistan and returning to the United States.

If you decide to travel to Turkmenistan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health and travel information.

Syria - Level 4: Do Not Travel

1 month ago

Do not travel to Syria due to terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, armed conflict, and risk of unjust detention.

Country Summary: The U.S. Embassy in Damascus suspended its operations in February 2012. The Czech Republic serves as the protecting power for the United States in Syria. The U.S. government is unable to provide any emergency services to U.S. citizens in Syria.

Syria has experienced active armed conflict since 2011. No part of Syria is safe from violence. Kidnappings by armed groups, unjust arrests and/or detentions, the use of chemical warfare, shelling, and aerial bombardment of civilian centers pose significant risk of death or serious injury. The destruction of infrastructure, housing, medical facilities, schools, and power and water utilities has also increased hardships inside the country.

The U.S. government particularly warns private U.S. citizens against traveling to Syria to engage in armed conflict. U.S. citizens who undertake such activity face extreme personal risks, including kidnapping by armed groups, unjust arrests, injury, or death. The U.S. government does not support this activity. Our ability to provide consular assistance to individuals who are injured or kidnapped, or to the families of individuals who die in the conflict, is extremely limited.

Protests and demonstrations are quelled by government forces through aggressive tactics and protestors, activists, and political dissenters are routinely detained without access to legal representation or communications with friends and family.

Terrorist groups are active in Syria. Parts of Syria have experienced recent increases in incidents of bombings, IEDs, and assassinations. Fighting on behalf of or providing other forms of support to designated terrorist organizations, including ISIS and al-Qaeda affiliates, can constitute the provision of material support for terrorism, which is a crime under U.S. law that can result in penalties including prison time and large fines.

There is an ongoing risk of kidnapping and detentions of U.S. citizens and Westerners throughout the country. U.S. citizens remain a target. U.S. citizens are also targets of abduction and/or unjust detention by the Syrian government and while in detention do not have access to due process or medical attention. Government detention centers are known to be unsanitary facilities where widespread cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment of detainees has been documented, as well as torture and extrajudicial killings. Minors, persons with physical, sensory, or mental disabilities, and elderly have frequently been victims of unjust detention. The Syrian government has also been implicated in the enforced or involuntary disappearance of more than 100,000 citizens, including medical and humanitarian workers, journalists, human rights activists, political opposition, and additionally those suspected of affiliation with these groups and their family members. Note: Only the Syrian government can issue a valid entry visa to Syria. Failure to obtain a legitimate entry visa directly from the Syrian government could result in detention.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Syria, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR), which says that heightened military activity associated with the Syrian conflict may result in the risk of GPS interference, communications jamming, and errant long-range surface to air missiles straying into adjacent airspace within 200 nautical miles of the Damascus Flight Information Region. These activities may inadvertently pose hazards to civil aviation transiting the region. It also has the potential to spill over into the adjacent airspace managed by neighboring states and eastern portions of the Mediterranean Sea.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Syria.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Syria has an unknown level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Syria:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information.   
  • Visit our website on Travel to High Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Leave DNA samples with your medical provider in case it is necessary for your family to access them.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization or consider consulting with a professional security organization.
  • Develop a communication plan with family and/or your employer or host organization so that they can monitor your safety and location as you travel through high-risk areas. This plan should specify who you would contact first, and how they should share the information.
  • Enroll your trip in the State Department's Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Panama - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to Panama due to COVID-19 quarantine requirements.  Exercise increased caution in Panama due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • Parts of the Mosquito Gulf due to crime.
  • Parts of the Darién Region due to crime.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Panama.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Panama has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.  There are mandatory quarantine requirements for U.S. and other foreign citizens who test positive for COVID-19.  Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Panama.

If you decide to travel to Panama:

Parts of the "Mosquito Gulf" – Level 4: Do Not Travel

The “Mosquito Gulf” is an extremely remote and inaccessible area along part of the north (Caribbean) coast.

Do not travel within 10 miles of the coastline, from Boca de Rio, Chiriqui to Cocle del Norte. Drug trafficking and other illicit activities occur in this area.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in this region as U.S. government personnel must obtain prior approval before traveling there and face additional restrictions before such travel is approved.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Parts of the Darién Region – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel to the following areas of the Darien:

  • All areas south of Jaque to Manene to Yaviza to Lajas Blancas cities to the Colombian border
  • The city of Lajas Blancas
  • The city of El Salto

Criminal elements and drug and human trafficking networks operate in these areas. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these regions as U.S. government personnel must obtain prior approval before traveling there and face additional restrictions before such travel is approved.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Niger - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 month ago

Reconsider travel to Niger due to crime, terrorism, and kidnapping.

Country Summary: Violent crime, such as armed robbery, is common.

Terrorist groups continue plotting kidnappings and possible attacks in Niger. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting foreign and local government facilities and areas frequented by Westerners. Terrorists operate in the areas bordering Mali, Libya, Burkina Faso, and throughout northern Niger. Avoid travel to Niger’s border regions, particularly the Malian border area, Diffa region, and the Lake Chad region. Mali-based extremist groups have crossed the border and conducted multiple lethal attacks on Nigerien security forces.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote and rural areas as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel outside of the capital, Niamey, due to security concerns. Outside of Niamey, all U.S. Embassy personnel are required to travel only during daylight hours and in a minimum of a two-vehicle convoy accompanied by armed Nigerien government security escorts.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Niger.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Niger has a low level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Niger:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel, and read the Embassy COVID-19 page for country-specific COVID-19 information. 
  • Visitors are urged to stay in hotels with armed Nigerien security presence.
  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Make contingency plans to leave the country.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Keep travel documents up to date and easily accessible.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for Niger.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations.  Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Kuwait - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions

1 month ago

Exercise normal precautions in Kuwait. Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The desert region near the border with Iraq due to the prevalence of unexploded ordnance.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • The Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh area in Kuwait City due to crime.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Kuwait, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Kuwait.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kuwait has a high level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Kuwait:

Desert Region North of the Mutla’a Ridge and Near the Border with Iraq – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Desert areas and certain beaches north of the Mutla’a Ridge continue to contain unexploded ordnance left over from the 1990-1991 Gulf War. Travelers should avoid areas that are “off the beaten path” and avoid touching objects that are potentially unexploded ordnance.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

The Kuwaiti Ministry of Interior has identified the neighborhood of Jeleeb Al-Shuyoukh on the outskirts of Kuwait International Airport as a high-crime area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to health information.

Kazakhstan - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Kazakhstan due to the possibility of civil unrest.

Country Summary: Demonstrations, protests, and strikes may occur. These events can develop quickly and without prior notification, often interrupting traffic, transportation, communication, and other services; such events have the potential to turn violent. U.S. citizens in Kazakhstan should be aware that such protests may impact the U.S. Embassy’s ability to provide consular services, including assistance to U.S. citizens departing Kazakhstan.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Kazakhstan.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Kazakhstan has an unknown level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Kazakhstan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to health information.

Bahrain - Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

1 month ago

Exercise increased caution in Bahrain due to terrorism.

Country Summary: Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Bahrain. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and local government facilities.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Bahrain.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined Bahrain has a moderate level of COVID-19.  Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

If you decide to travel to Bahrain:

Last Update:  Reissued with updates to terrorism and health information.