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Nepal - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

1 day 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Nepal due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Nepal due to the potential for isolated political violence.   

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health.

Notice for Nepal due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Nepal. 

On May 7, the Department of State authorized the voluntary departure of family members of U.S. government employees and non-emergency U.S. government employees from Nepal.

Commercial flights departing Nepal are currently not regularly available.  U.S. citizens who wish to depart Nepal should register their interest with the Embassy by completing the following online form: https://bit.ly/3eUPFC0

U.S. citizens should also refer to the U.S. Embassy’s web page for updated flight information.  

Political demonstrations intended to be peaceful can sometimes escalate into violence and may be met with force by Nepali authorities.   

Read the country information page.   

If you decide to travel to Nepal:  

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.   
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.     
  • Avoid demonstrations and crowds.  
  • Do not trek alone.   
  • Be aware that infrastructure, government services and medical assistance may not be up to U.S. standards.  
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.  
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.  
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Nepal.  
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.  

Last Update: Reissued with updates to post’s operating status.

Watch - Dengue in the Americas

2 days 2 hours ago
Dengue is a risk in many parts of Central and South America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Some countries are reporting increased numbers of cases of the disease. Travelers to the Americas can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites.

India - Level 4: Do Not Travel

3 days 2 hours ago

Do not travel to India due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to crime and terrorism.

On April 28, 2021, the Department approved the voluntary departure of family members of U.S. government employees.

On May 5, 2021, the Department approved the voluntary departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees.

U.S. citizens who wish to depart India should take advantage of available commercial transportation options.     

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for India due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in India.

Do not travel to:

  • The state of Jammu and Kashmir (except the eastern Ladakh region and its capital, Leh) due to terrorism and civil unrest.
  • Within 10 km of the India-Pakistan border due to the potential for armed conflict.

Indian authorities report rape is one of the fastest growing crimes in India. Violent crime, such as sexual assault, has occurred at tourist sites and in other locations.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, and government facilities.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in rural areas from eastern Maharashtra and northern Telangana through western West Bengal as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these areas. Read the country information page.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to India:

State of Jammu and Kashmir

Terrorist attacks and violent civil unrest are possible in the state of Jammu and Kashmir. Avoid all travel to this state (with the exception of visits to the eastern Ladakh region and its capital, Leh). Sporadic violence occurs particularly along the Line of Control (LOC) separating India and Pakistan, and in tourist destinations in the Kashmir Valley: Srinagar, Gulmarg, and Pahalgam. The Indian government prohibits foreign tourists from visiting certain areas along the LOC. Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

India-Pakistan Border

India and Pakistan maintain a strong military presence on both sides of the border. The only official India-Pakistan border crossing point for persons who are not citizens of India or Pakistan is in the state of Punjab between Atari, India, and Wagah, Pakistan. The border crossing is usually open, but confirm the current status of the border crossing prior to commencing travel. A Pakistani visa is required to enter Pakistan. Only U.S. citizens residing in India may apply for a Pakistani visa in India. Otherwise apply for a Pakistani visa in your country of residence before traveling to India. Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Northeastern States

Incidents of violence by ethnic insurgent groups, including bombings of buses, trains, rail lines, and markets, occur occasionally in the northeast.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to the states of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram, Nagaland, Meghalaya, Tripura, and Manipur without special authorization from the U.S. Consulate General in Kolkata. Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Central and East India

Maoist extremist groups, or “Naxalites,” are active in a large swath of India from eastern Maharashtra and northern Telangana through western West Bengal, particularly in rural parts of Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand and on the borders of Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, West Bengal, and Odisha. The Naxalites have conducted frequent terrorist attacks on local police, paramilitary forces, and government officials.

Due to the fluid nature of the threat, all U.S. government travelers to states with Naxalite activity must receive special authorization from the U.S. consulate responsible for the area to be visited. U.S. officials traveling only to the capital cities in these states do not need prior authorization. Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to posts’ operating status.

Timor-Leste - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Timor-Leste due to COVID-19-related travel restrictions. Exercise increased caution in Timor-Leste due to crime and civil unrest.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Timor-Leste due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place affecting entry into Timor-Leste, including for U.S. citizens. Commercial transportation to/from Timor-Leste is not available or only sporadically available. It may be difficult to enter or leave Timor-Leste and travelers should expect delays entering Timor-Leste and/or returning to the United States. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Timor-Leste.

Country Summary: Timor-Leste has seen isolated instances of police responding to protests with force and the use of tear gas. Stone throwing attacks on vehicles can occur during gang conflicts and periods of unrest. Gender-based violence is high in Timor-Leste, and sexual harassment is fairly common.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Timor-Leste:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

Papua New Guinea - Level 4: Do Not Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Do not travel to Papua New Guinea due to COVID-19, crime, civil unrest, health concerns, natural disasters, and kidnapping. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Papua New Guinea for COVID-19, indicating an unknown level of COVID-19 in the country. There are restrictions in place, including third-country transit requirements, affecting U.S. citizen entry and exit in Papua New Guinea. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Papua New Guinea.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Bougainville, particularly areas near the Panguna mine, due to civil unrest.
  • The Highlands region due to civil unrest.
  • Areas in the vicinity of Mt. Ulawun on the island of New Britain due to natural disaster.

Country Summary: Violent crime, including sexual assault, carjackings, home invasions, kidnappings, and armed robberies, is common. Tensions between communal or clan groups may result in violence at any time without warning. Police presence is limited outside of the capital Port Moresby, and police may be unable to assist due to limited resources.

Public demonstrations, especially in population centers, are common and may turn violent. Even peaceful demonstrations may present opportunities for criminal elements or other actors to exacerbate local political tensions.

On August 21, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a Level 2 Travel Notice for Papua New Guinea regarding an outbreak of vaccine-derived poliovirus in the Morobe Province. Refer to the CDC for additional information and advice on the outbreak.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Port Moresby due to limited transportation infrastructure. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to areas of concern, including Bougainville.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Papua New Guinea:

Areas Near the Panguna Mine - Reconsider Travel

The Autonomous Bougainville Government has designated areas near the Panguna mine as “no go zones" due to the risk of violence and civil unrest. Bougainville police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious criminal incidents.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Port Moresby due to limited transportation infrastructure. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to areas of concern, including Bougainville.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

The Highlands Region - Reconsider Travel

There is a heightened risk of tribal violence in the region.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Port Moresby due to limited transportation infrastructure. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization before traveling to areas of concern, including Bougainville.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas in the Vicinity of Mt. Ulawun - Reconsider Travel

Recent years have seen regular volcanic activity at Mt. Ulawun, a volcano on the eastern end of the island of New Britain. A major eruption occurred in June 2019, leading to widespread ash fall, the displacement of local communities, and the temporary closure of the international airport in Hoskins.

Smaller, but still significant, eruptions occurred in August and October 2019. Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Sri Lanka - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider Travel to Sri Lanka due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Sri Lanka due to terrorism

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Sri Lanka due to COVID-19, indicating a high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Sri Lanka.

Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets, shopping malls, government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, hospitals, and other public areas.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in remote areas.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Sri Lanka:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19. 
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.   
  • Be aware of your surroundings when traveling to tourist locations and crowded public venues.
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities.
  • Monitor local media for breaking events and adjust your plans based on new information.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Sri Lanka.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Burundi - Level 3: Reconsider Travel

5 days 2 hours ago

Reconsider travel to Burundi due to crime, health, and political violence. Exercise increased caution due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Burundi due to COVID-19, indicating a moderate level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Burundi.

Country Summary: Violent crimes, such as grenade attacks and armed robbery, occur frequently. Though Westerners are unlikely to be targeted, the risk of being in the wrong place at the wrong time is high. Local police lack the resources and training to respond effectively to crimes.

Medical services in Burundi fall well below U.S. standards, and there are no adequate trauma services in the country. Emergency medical and fire services are limited or non-existent in some areas of the country. The CDC has also issued a Level 1 Travel Notice on Malaria in Burundi.

There are ongoing political tensions in Burundi, causing sporadic violence throughout the country. Police and military checkpoints are common and can restrict freedom of movement. Police have conducted weapon searches in the homes of private citizens. In the provinces of Cibitoke and Bubanza, near the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda, as well as Mutimbuzi commune in Bujumbura Rural province, there have been armed attacks primarily conducted by groups operating from the eastern DRC. The border may close without notice.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens throughout Burundi. U.S. Embassy personnel are subject to restrictions when traveling in certain areas of Burundi and may be subject to other constraints as security conditions warrant. These restrictions include limitations on all travel during hours of darkness (typically 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.) and require prior approval for travel outside of the Bujumbura Mairie Central area. The former Central Market located on Chaussee Prince Louis Rwagasore is off-limits to U.S. Embassy personnel at all times, due to high rates of crime.  

Due to travel restrictions on U.S. Embassy personnel, the U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the following areas: the provinces of Bubanza and Cibitoke, Kibira National Park (including the park’s southernmost part in Muramvya province), and Ruvubu and Buriri Forest. Embassy personnel are also prohibited from transiting through Kibira National Park to reach Kayanza via the RN-10.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Burundi:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Read the CDC Travel Notice on Malaria in Burundi.
  • Visit the CDC Travelers’ Health Page for Burundi.
  • Bring a sufficient supply of over-the-counter and prescription medicines.
  • Obtain comprehensive medical insurance that includes medical evacuation.
  • Avoid areas where there are large gatherings, protests, or demonstrations, and exercise caution in the vicinity of any such gatherings.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings and be vigilant when traveling in unfamiliar areas or outside of cities and along border areas; take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security.
  • Consider traveling in pairs and using convoys of multiple vehicles to mitigate the risks related to traveling outside of Bujumbura. Carry additional fuel, spare tires, and provisions. Include a map, navigation equipment, and first aid kit. Service stations are scarce in rural areas. Professional roadside assistance service is not available outside the capital.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Burundi.
  • Prepare contingency plans for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

Alert - Polio in Africa

5 days 2 hours ago
There are polio outbreaks in several countries in Africa. CDC recommends that all travelers to these countries be vaccinated fully against polio.

Afghanistan - Level 4: Do Not Travel

1 week 4 days ago

Do not travel to Afghanistan due to COVID-19, crime, terrorism, civil unrest, kidnapping, and armed conflict.

U.S. citizens wishing to depart Afghanistan should leave as soon as possible on available commercial flights. 

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Afghanistan due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Afghanistan.

On April 27, 2021, the Department ordered the departure from U.S. Embassy Kabul of U.S. government employees whose functions can be performed elsewhere.

Travel to all areas of Afghanistan is unsafe because of critical levels of kidnappings, hostage taking, suicide bombings, widespread military combat operations, landmines, and terrorist and insurgent attacks, including attacks using vehicle-borne, magnetic, or other improvised explosive devices (IEDs), suicide vests, and grenades.

Terrorist and insurgent groups continue planning and executing attacks in Afghanistan. These attacks occur with little or no warning, and have targeted official Afghan and U.S. government convoys and facilities, local government buildings, foreign embassies, military installations, commercial entities, non-governmental organization (NGO) offices, hospitals, residential compounds, tourist locations, transportation hubs, public gatherings, markets and shopping areas, places of worship, restaurants, hotels, universities, airports, schools, gymnasiums, and other locations frequented by U.S. citizens and other foreign nationals.

The U.S. Embassy's ability to provide routine and emergency services to U.S. citizens in Afghanistan is severely limited, particularly outside of Kabul. Evacuation options from Afghanistan are extremely limited due to the lack of infrastructure, geographic constraints, and the volatile security situation.

Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Afghanistan. Unofficial travel to Afghanistan by U.S. government employees and their family members is restricted and requires prior approval from the Department of State. U.S. Embassy personnel are restricted from traveling to all locations in Kabul except the U.S. Embassy and other U.S. government facilities unless there is a compelling U.S. government interest in permitting such travel that outweighs the risk. Additional security measures are needed for any U.S. government employee travel and movement through Afghanistan.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within or in the vicinity of Afghanistan, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Afghanistan:

  • See the U.S. Embassy's web page regarding COVID-19.
  • Visit the CDC’s webpage on Travel and COVID-19.
  • Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.
  • Draft a will and designate appropriate insurance beneficiaries and/or power of attorney.
  • Discuss a plan with loved ones regarding care/custody of children, pets, property, belongings, non-liquid assets (collections, artwork, etc.), funeral wishes, etc.
  • Share important documents, login information, and points of contact with loved ones so that they can manage your affairs, if you are unable to return as planned to the United States. Consider signing a power of attorney.
  • Establish your own personal security plan in coordination with your employer or host organization, or consider consulting with a professional security organization. Carry a communication device and, where possible, ride in armored vehicles.
  • Notify a trusted person of your travel itinerary and contact information. Avoid discussing your movement plans in public where you can be overheard or with persons who do not have the need to know.
  • Obtain medical evacuation insurance with a company that operates in Afghanistan and obtain a list of clinics and hospitals that may be used as an evacuation point.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Afghanistan.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to post’s operation status.